Saturday, June 21, 2008

SNY: Give Horne A Shot

The SNY site had an article up yesterday on Alan Horne regarding his place within the starting pitching pecking order.

Though the piece makes several strong points [i.e. the team's reluctance to rush pitching prospects in lieu of Hughes and Kennedys' tough starts], the author seems to forget Horne has only started twice since missing over a month with a bicep strain.

There is also the fact that he has only tossed a total of 24 AAA innings. After Phil Hughes spent so little time at AAA, the Yankees are reasonably hesitant to push Horne into the majors and are not simply being "gun shy" as the article portends.

Otherwise, the post has some insightful remarks thanks to Deric McKamey of BaseballIQ:
The injury to workhorse starter Chien-Ming Wang seriously threatens to submerge the Yankees' playoff hopes, which already were taking on water despite the recent spate of wins against the overmatched National League.

Deric McKamey of and author of the Minor League Baseball Analyst thinks Horne deserves a shot.

“I’d definitely gamble on Horne’s upside before recycling guys like Rasner and Giese,” McKamey said. “I think there’s concern, though, given what happened to Kennedy. But Horne’s stuff is better than Kennedy’s. Of course, Phil Hughes disappointed, too, but now that’s being blamed on the injury. Their bad luck with pitching prospects is making them reluctant [with Horne].”

Horne’s fastball is his best pitch, clocking in at 94 mph consistently and with decent movement.

“He has very good stuff and obviously can miss bats,” McKamey said. “But the worry with him is his command. What’s going to happen when he falls behind to big league hitters? But, again, I think the Yankees are feeling a little gun shy right now and aren’t being as aggressive as maybe they should be.”

The 92-95 mph fastball is an enticing thought - especially when its paired with a filthy power curveball, serviceable slider and developing change. However, Salfino does not emphasize enough that 24 innings at the AAA level is pretty premature in promoting a starter to the big leagues - particular if said pitcher has not been completely dominant and is returning from injury.

The credibility of the piece also comes into question with this utter glibness:
Hughes (rib fracture) is ready to start throwing again in about a week. But Hughes has become sort of the new Mark Prior minus the good pitching.
Right. That wouldn't be a Mets fan writing for the Mets TV network, would it?

No comments: